A companion to modern Chinese literature by Yingjin Zhang

By Yingjin Zhang

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8 Two related areas are not represented in this companion: first, literature and translation (Eoyang 1992; Eoyang and Lin 1995; L. Liu 1999; Gamsa 2008; L. Chan 2010; McDougall 2011; St. André and Peng 2012; Tam and Chan 2012; L. Wong 2013; H.  Peng and Dilley 2014); second, reception of literature, including audience studies, both domestic (Link 2000; S. Kong 2005; K. Hang 2013; Y. Zheng 2013) and overseas (Mair 2001: 1079‐104; L. Chan 2003; McDougall 2003; Lovell 2006). 9 This sampling of English books does not include titles in comparative literature that compare a Chinese writer with one or more Western writers in relation to specific genres and issues.

Cheng 2013), revolution (G. Davies 2013), evolution (Pusey 1998; A. Jones 2011), and violence (E. S. Chou 2012). Contrary to a veritable boom of books in Chinese scholarship, Eileen Chang has received no exclusive monograph treatment, although two volumes came out recently (Louie 2013; Peng and Dilley 2014), and discussions of her works are scattered in various English books. Significantly, except for Ding Ling (Alber 2002; Alber 2004), Guo Moruo (Xiaoming Chen 2008), and Tian Han (L. Luo 2014), the majority of recent monographs on a single author from the late Qing and Republican periods deal with “conservative” or non‐leftist writers, such as Dai Wangshu (G.

In Lu Xun studies, scholars have revisited his old‐style poems (Kowallis 1996), his prose collection Wild Grass (Kaldis 2014), his fictional character Ah Q and Ah Q progeny (P. Foster 2006), his love lives (McDougall 2002), his contemplations on the past (E. Cheng 2013), revolution (G. Davies 2013), evolution (Pusey 1998; A. Jones 2011), and violence (E. S. Chou 2012). Contrary to a veritable boom of books in Chinese scholarship, Eileen Chang has received no exclusive monograph treatment, although two volumes came out recently (Louie 2013; Peng and Dilley 2014), and discussions of her works are scattered in various English books.

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